Edmilibandmp.com -

Uncategorized

July 7, 2007

what we do

What Do We Do?
My role as an MP is to represent all the people in my constituency; not just those who voted for me. Whether or not you voted for me or agree with the views of my party, I am your MP and I am still here to help you with all matters for which Parliament or central government is responsible.
Who Do We Represent?
Doncaster North Constituency is made up of
Who Do We Represent?
Doncaster North Constituency is made up of the following wards
Adwick
Askern
Bentley
Great North Road
Kirk Sandall
Edenthorpe and Barnby Dunn
Stainforth and Moorends
Thorne
How Can We Help You?
MPs are there to help only with those matters for which Parliament or central government is responsible. Problems often arise with work carried out by central government departments and I will be able to help you with such areas as the National Health Service, benefits, pensions and tax and schools.
What Do We Do To Help You?
Where your problem does involve central government, I have a number of methods available to try to resolve the matter. A letter from me to the relevant department or official will often provide a solution. If not, I may decide to take matters a stage further by writing to the Minister involved, or even making an appointment to see the Minister personally. Many constituents’ problems can be solved in this way but not all problems, of course, have an easy solution. The Minister may not be able to give the answer that you wanted to hear but if the decision has been made in the right way, there may be little that can be done.
If, on the other hand, there has been unnecessary delay, or if some essential procedure has been missed out, i.e. if there has been maladministration, I may be able to take your case to the Ombudsman (Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration).I am able to resolve such cases where there has been administrative incompetence. The Ombudsman can only be approached via an MP – you cannot approach him directly.
I cannot help you in private disputes with other individuals or with companies who have sold you faulty goods, nor, for example, to interfere with decisions made by courts – contact your local Citizens Advice Bureau or Trading Standards.
What is the difference between a councillor and an MP?
My job as your MP is to represent the people of Doncaster North in the national Parliament in London. I am here to help you with all matters for which Parliament or central government is responsible. There are 659 MPs in the United Kingdom. A councillor is elected by local people to represent a ward on the local Council. There are 21,000 councillors in England and Wales.
Your councillor makes decisions affecting the ward and the wider council area and acts as a focus and leader for the local community. They tend to deal with issues relating to council housing, planning, rubbish collection, the local environment, and the administration of elections. Find out who your councillor is here
How can you help? We want your ideas and we want to work together. My office and I see our role as helping people to get on with improving their community. Please see Reasons to Get in Touch for more information.

What Do We Do?
My role as an MP is to represent all the people in my constituency; not just those who voted for me. Whether or not you voted for me or agree with the views of my party, I am your MP and I am still here to help you with all matters for which Parliament or central government is responsible.
Who Do We Represent?
Doncaster North Constituency is made up of
Who Do We Represent?
Doncaster North Constituency is made up of the following wardsAdwick
Askern
Bentley
Great North Road
Kirk Sandall
Edenthorpe and Barnby Dunn
Stainforth and Moorends
Thorne
How Can We Help You?
MPs are there to help only with those matters for which Parliament or central government is responsible. Problems often arise with work carried out by central government departments and I will be able to help you with such areas as the National Health Service, benefits, pensions and tax and schools.
What Do We Do To Help You?
Where your problem does involve central government, I have a number of methods available to try to resolve the matter. A letter from me to the relevant department or official will often provide a solution. If not, I may decide to take matters a stage further by writing to the Minister involved, or even making an appointment to see the Minister personally. Many constituents’ problems can be solved in this way but not all problems, of course, have an easy solution. The Minister may not be able to give the answer that you wanted to hear but if the decision has been made in the right way, there may be little that can be done.
If, on the other hand, there has been unnecessary delay, or if some essential procedure has been missed out, i.e. if there has been maladministration, I may be able to take your case to the Ombudsman (Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration).I am able to resolve such cases where there has been administrative incompetence. The Ombudsman can only be approached via an MP – you cannot approach him directly.
I cannot help you in private disputes with other individuals or with companies who have sold you faulty goods, nor, for example, to interfere with decisions made by courts – contact your local Citizens Advice Bureau or Trading Standards.
What is the difference between a councillor and an MP?
My job as your MP is to represent the people of Doncaster North in the national Parliament in London. I am here to help you with all matters for which Parliament or central government is responsible. There are 659 MPs in the United Kingdom. A councillor is elected by local people to represent a ward on the local Council. There are 21,000 councillors in England and Wales.
Your councillor makes decisions affecting the ward and the wider council area and acts as a focus and leader for the local community. They tend to deal with issues relating to council housing, planning, rubbish collection, the local environment, and the administration of elections. Find out who your councillor is here
How can you help? We want your ideas and we want to work together. My office and I see our role as helping people to get on with improving their community. Please see Reasons to Get in Touch for more information.

Uncategorized

June 25, 2007

Get involved

Get involved in something you care about
My office and I can’t improve our area on our own. We need your help
We can help make your ideas happen by providing our know how, our connections, or simply arranging a meeting…
At the moment we are working on:
Establishing meetings with local businesses and organisations;
Campaign for better transport including link road to Junction 5 of the M18 and the feasibility of Askern train station;
Campaign for better, more responsive youth services;
Work to ensure Hatfield pit fully reopens;
Work to establish a Mobile Cinema for Doncaster North;

Get involved in something you care aboutMy office and I can’t improve our area on our own. We need your help
We can help make your ideas happen by providing our know how, our connections, or simply arranging a meeting…
At the moment we are working on:
Establishing meetings with local businesses and organisations;
Campaign for better transport including link road to Junction 5 of the M18 and the feasibility of Askern train station;
Campaign for better, more responsive youth services;
Work to ensure Hatfield pit fully reopens;
Work to establish a Mobile Cinema for Doncaster North;

Uncategorized

May 13, 2007

Sunday Times article

From The Sunday Times
May 13, 2007
New Labour needs a new tune
Ed Miliband
All of us who have been part of the government over the past decade, as I was as an adviser to Gordon Brown at the Treasury, must take up his call not simply to defend what we have done but to be willing to learn from experience. Indeed, we have a unique opportunity to use the period of this leadership election campaign to go out and talk to the country and listen to its concerns and new priorities.
We start from a strong platform of success. Over the past decade new Labour has reshaped the political map of Great Britain. Issues that used to be contentious – tax-funding of the NHS, Bank of England independence or whether tackling poverty was a matter for government – have become subjects on which we have shifted mainstream opinion.
We achieved this by reaching beyond our traditional support. Our task is to renew this broad support with clear values and by responding to new challenges and the demand for a different type of politics.
An important part of our ethos has been and must be a strong focus on equality of opportunity: a belief that all should have a fair chance to achieve their potential because it is right and because our society will then be a better place to live for all of us.
A number of challenges face us far more starkly than a decade ago. In particular, globalisation, including the movement of jobs and people, shows that government must play its necessary role.
For globalisation to continue to command public support we need an answer to the people who worry about competition for low-wage jobs driving down earnings. Part of it must be about the proper enforcement of agreed protection, such as the minimum wage. But the best long-term answer must be a greater focus on working out how, through skills and training, we can give people the chance to move into better jobs.
The best means of extending opportunity at all ages remains education. Inequality of opportunity starts at birth and is affected by a range of influences as children grow up. School reform and investment need to continue, but creating a fairer society cannot be done in the classroom alone. What happens before children get to school, what happens out of school and career pathways after school matter. That means childcare, youth services and vocational skills must be increased priorities.
But a commitment to equality of opportunity must also embrace people’s ability to have more control over their own lives: from democracy to public services. All politicians are now talking about empowerment in different ways.
For Labour it must be allied to a government that supports people rather than one that withdraws. Take Sure Start, the government’s initiative on services for parents and young children. Government provides the funding but priorities must be shaped locally by families.
And there are new areas where we must do more to give people a voice. Take, for example, policing. I see, as an MP in Doncaster, people’s concern about crime and also their desire to determine local priorities.
We need to find ways of building on the regular, local beat meetings being pioneered in different parts of the country so that people feel they have a say and there is proper accountability on this crucial issue for our communities.
A new approach is needed not just in the way people are consulted and involved on key issues in the public services, but also in the way our democracy works and the government functions. Gordon Brown talked at the launch of his campaign about the need for institutional change in the powers of parliament. There also needs to be a change in the relationship between politicians and citizens.
In the mid1990s it was Labour that drew people to it with a sense that it could listen and better stay in touch with people’s concerns. But in some areas we need to do better. The public rightly demands a more engaged, open style of politics and we need to respond.
It is essential we use the coming weeks of this leadership election campaign to look outwards. Debates within Labour will take place about direction and priorities, but what the country wants is a government and a party reaching out to them.
Some people believe this will produce a clash between the concerns of traditional Labour voters and those who came to Labour in 1997. In fact our values applied to new problems, for example affordable housing, balancing work and family life, and the environment, can meet the concerns of people across the country.
After 10 years in government, renewal is difficult. But I have one great reason for optimism: the underlying values of the country. For the past year I have had the privilege to be the minister for the charitable sector and social enterprise – businesses founded for social ends, such as Jamie Oliver’s Fifteen. I see a commitment to social good, particularly among young people, much more marked than 10 years ago.
So David Cameron is not leading a Conservative ideological resurgence but is having to try to adapt to a society that embraces values of social justice. This should give Labour confidence that by building on our record, listening to the electorate and applying our enduring values, we can win people’s trust that we are best placed to meet the challenges the country faces.
Ed Miliband is minister for the third sector in the Cabinet Office. This is based on an essay in Politics for a New Generation: The Progressive Moment, edited by Nick Pearce and Julia Margo
Sheryll Bonilla – Message left at 08:30 am, Sat 2nd Jun 2007
I agree with what you’ve said — education, childcare, youth services, vocational skills. As a former manager, however, other critical components are behavior and way of thinking. Sometimes people
simply don’t get hired because they have never learned to behave the way “proper people” ought, or they lack the confidence, or are too “cut throat” (selfish and self centered) as opposed to people
“brought up properly” who are more “civilized.” I’m not sure how to say these things, but in the ladder of opportunity, these are critical. You and your brother are fortunate to have been raised in
an atmosphere where you learned to discuss matters respectfully and how to speak diplomatically and to think with consideration for others. This civilized behavior gets you into high places quickly.
As you say, “inequality of opportunity starts at birth” and those kids who are smart and would otherwise do well may instead meet up with frustration because they haven’t learned to speak
diplomatically or with subtlety, as do the people who have the power to hire or promote them. They may come from a more plain speaking environment, which is seen in more polite circles as
undesirable, and hence hit the glass ceiling. That’s something that should be put into curriculum if at all possible to teach to break down that invisible social barrier.

From The Sunday Times
May 13, 2007
New Labour needs a new tune
Ed Miliband
All of us who have been part of the government over the past decade, as I was as an adviser to Gordon Brown at the Treasury, must take up his call not simply to defend what we have done but to be willing to learn from experience. Indeed, we have a unique opportunity to use the period of this leadership election campaign to go out and talk to the country and listen to its concerns and new priorities.
We start from a strong platform of success. Over the past decade new Labour has reshaped the political map of Great Britain. Issues that used to be contentious – tax-funding of the NHS, Bank of England independence or whether tackling poverty was a matter for government – have become subjects on which we have shifted mainstream opinion.
We achieved this by reaching beyond our traditional support. Our task is to renew this broad support with clear values and by responding to new challenges and the demand for a different type of politics.
An important part of our ethos has been and must be a strong focus on equality of opportunity: a belief that all should have a fair chance to achieve their potential because it is right and because our society will then be a better place to live for all of us.
A number of challenges face us far more starkly than a decade ago. In particular, globalisation, including the movement of jobs and people, shows that government must play its necessary role.
For globalisation to continue to command public support we need an answer to the people who worry about competition for low-wage jobs driving down earnings. Part of it must be about the proper enforcement of agreed protection, such as the minimum wage. But the best long-term answer must be a greater focus on working out how, through skills and training, we can give people the chance to move into better jobs.
The best means of extending opportunity at all ages remains education. Inequality of opportunity starts at birth and is affected by a range of influences as children grow up. School reform and investment need to continue, but creating a fairer society cannot be done in the classroom alone. What happens before children get to school, what happens out of school and career pathways after school matter. That means childcare, youth services and vocational skills must be increased priorities.
But a commitment to equality of opportunity must also embrace people’s ability to have more control over their own lives: from democracy to public services. All politicians are now talking about empowerment in different ways.
For Labour it must be allied to a government that supports people rather than one that withdraws. Take Sure Start, the government’s initiative on services for parents and young children. Government provides the funding but priorities must be shaped locally by families.
And there are new areas where we must do more to give people a voice. Take, for example, policing. I see, as an MP in Doncaster, people’s concern about crime and also their desire to determine local priorities.
We need to find ways of building on the regular, local beat meetings being pioneered in different parts of the country so that people feel they have a say and there is proper accountability on this crucial issue for our communities.
A new approach is needed not just in the way people are consulted and involved on key issues in the public services, but also in the way our democracy works and the government functions. Gordon Brown talked at the launch of his campaign about the need for institutional change in the powers of parliament. There also needs to be a change in the relationship between politicians and citizens.
In the mid1990s it was Labour that drew people to it with a sense that it could listen and better stay in touch with people’s concerns. But in some areas we need to do better. The public rightly demands a more engaged, open style of politics and we need to respond.
It is essential we use the coming weeks of this leadership election campaign to look outwards. Debates within Labour will take place about direction and priorities, but what the country wants is a government and a party reaching out to them.
Some people believe this will produce a clash between the concerns of traditional Labour voters and those who came to Labour in 1997. In fact our values applied to new problems, for example affordable housing, balancing work and family life, and the environment, can meet the concerns of people across the country.
After 10 years in government, renewal is difficult. But I have one great reason for optimism: the underlying values of the country. For the past year I have had the privilege to be the minister for the charitable sector and social enterprise – businesses founded for social ends, such as Jamie Oliver’s Fifteen. I see a commitment to social good, particularly among young people, much more marked than 10 years ago.
So David Cameron is not leading a Conservative ideological resurgence but is having to try to adapt to a society that embraces values of social justice. This should give Labour confidence that by building on our record, listening to the electorate and applying our enduring values, we can win people’s trust that we are best placed to meet the challenges the country faces.
Ed Miliband is minister for the third sector in the Cabinet Office. This is based on an essay in Politics for a New Generation: The Progressive Moment, edited by Nick Pearce and Julia Margo
Sheryll Bonilla – Message left at 08:30 am, Sat 2nd Jun 2007I agree with what you’ve said — education, childcare, youth services, vocational skills. As a former manager, however, other critical components are behavior and way of thinking. Sometimes peoplesimply don’t get hired because they have never learned to behave the way “proper people” ought, or they lack the confidence, or are too “cut throat” (selfish and self centered) as opposed to people”brought up properly” who are more “civilized.” I’m not sure how to say these things, but in the ladder of opportunity, these are critical. You and your brother are fortunate to have been raised inan atmosphere where you learned to discuss matters respectfully and how to speak diplomatically and to think with consideration for others. This civilized behavior gets you into high places quickly.As you say, “inequality of opportunity starts at birth” and those kids who are smart and would otherwise do well may instead meet up with frustration because they haven’t learned to speakdiplomatically or with subtlety, as do the people who have the power to hire or promote them. They may come from a more plain speaking environment, which is seen in more polite circles asundesirable, and hence hit the glass ceiling. That’s something that should be put into curriculum if at all possible to teach to break down that invisible social barrier.

Uncategorized

April 10, 2007

Do you have an idea

We’d like to know what ideas you have for improving Doncaster North.  To add your idea use the box below.

If you prefer to meet face to face then get a group of friends, family or colleagues together and we’ll meet with you at a place of your choosing. You can meet Ed and the team in the pub, your local café or even at home – to have your say get in touch.

We need to work together to improve our community.

Tim Chorlton – Message left at 01:39 pm, Tue 10th Apr 2007
r.e. Recycling I think the council haven’t given this enough thought. i.e. we have a large green wheelie bin to which we can put cardboard and garden refuse in. Most of my neighbours can get by, by
having these emptied once a month, yet we have a small green box, in which we can place, glass, cans tins clothes, paper and probably other things. A lot of residents are not bothering to recycle
once there green boxes are full and are throwing there recyclable items into the black bin. If the green bin and green boxes could be changsd over I am sure a lot more would be reycled, I know the
green whhelie bin waste would after be sorted but surely this would pay in the long run as less would be going to landfill. Yours sincerely Tim Chorlton
Options: reply to this message | report this message
Kate Schroder – Message left at 03:48 pm, Wed 4th Apr 2007
Would you meet with Stephen Fry and a leading mental health researcher to discuss ways in which people afected by BiPolar disorders fall through the nets attached to Third Sector and PCT level
service provision? Charities trying to work on contract negotiations with PCT s and otherwise cannot connect due to the ways in which the disorders are diagnosed and treated by tratdional providers-
our guys have accurate but humourous ways of explaining the problems. We will circulate via the media if you agree.
Options: reply to this message | report this message

Tim Chorlton – Message left at 01:39 pm, Tue 10th Apr 2007r.e. Recycling I think the council haven’t given this enough thought. i.e. we have a large green wheelie bin to which we can put cardboard and garden refuse in. Most of my neighbours can get by, byhaving these emptied once a month, yet we have a small green box, in which we can place, glass, cans tins clothes, paper and probably other things. A lot of residents are not bothering to recycleonce there green boxes are full and are throwing there recyclable items into the black bin. If the green bin and green boxes could be changsd over I am sure a lot more would be reycled, I know thegreen whhelie bin waste would after be sorted but surely this would pay in the long run as less would be going to landfill. Yours sincerely Tim Chorlton
Options: reply to this message | report this message

Kate Schroder – Message left at 03:48 pm, Wed 4th Apr 2007Would you meet with Stephen Fry and a leading mental health researcher to discuss ways in which people afected by BiPolar disorders fall through the nets attached to Third Sector and PCT levelservice provision? Charities trying to work on contract negotiations with PCT s and otherwise cannot connect due to the ways in which the disorders are diagnosed and treated by tratdional providers-our guys have accurate but humourous ways of explaining the problems. We will circulate via the media if you agree.
Options: reply to this message | report this message